pintori-olivetti

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Giovanni Pintori and his definitive visual language for Olivetti

Giovanni Pintori was an Italian designer born in 1912, Sardinia. He won a scholarship that allowed him to study at the Instituto Speriore per le Industrie Artistiche (the Higher Institute for Artistic Industries) in Monza from 1930 to 1936 and upon graduation joined the publicity department at Olivetti.

Olivetti was founded in 1908 and specialised in the production and design of typewriters. The Italian company came into contact with Pintori whilst promoting a collaborative town-planning project, that Pintori was part of. This project introduced Pintori to Renato Zveteremich, who was the director of Olivetti’s publicity department at the time.

Giovanni began his work with Olivetti in March 1938, and his work was showcased in various exhibitions and had a clear distinctive style that amplified the Olivetti brand image. His output for Olivetti was not just limited to advertising but included brochures, a new corporate identity and the design of exhibitions. His design defined the company’s visual image, and the iconic geometric designs are still as powerful and engaging today as they were in the 1950s.

By 1950 he was head of the graphic art department and in the same year, he was awarded the Grand Prix at the Milan Triennale. The designs were Pintori were also showcased in The Museum of Modern Arts exhibition, Olivetti: Design Industry in 1952.

Some of the notable designs he created below were scanned from various back issues of Graphis, Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015 and Rassegna 6, Il Campo della Grafica Italiana, 1981.

Olivetti, advertisement, 1962. Designed by Giovanni Pintori,
Olivetti, advertisement, 1962. Designed by Giovanni Pintori,

 

Olivetti, advertisement, 1960. Designed by Giovanni Pintori
Olivetti, advertisement, 1960. Designed by Giovanni Pintori

 

Olivetti Diaspron 82, advertisement, 1959. Designed by Giovanni Pintori.
Olivetti Diaspron 82, advertisement, 1959. Designed by Giovanni Pintori.

 

Olivetti 84, advertisement, 1962. Designed by Giovanni Pintori.
Olivetti 84, advertisement, 1962. Designed by Giovanni Pintori.

 

Giovanni Pintori, Olivetii Publicity, 1962 scanned from Rassegna 6, Il Campo della grafica italiana, 1981
Giovanni Pintori, Olivetii Publicity, 1962 scanned from Rassegna 6, Il Campo della grafica italiana, 1981

 

Giovanni Pintori, Olivetii Publicity, 1965 scanned from Rassegna 6, Il Campo della grafica italiana, 1981
Giovanni Pintori, Olivetii Publicity, 1965 scanned from Rassegna 6, Il Campo della grafica italiana, 1981

 

Giovanni Pintori, Olivetii Publicity, 1940 scanned from Rassegna 6, Il Campo della grafica italiana, 1981
Giovanni Pintori, Olivetii Publicity, 1940 scanned from Rassegna 6, Il Campo della grafica italiana, 1981

 

Olivetti, Europe's largest manufacturers of office machines, 1960 designed by Giovanni Pintori
Olivetti, Europe’s largest manufacturers of office machines, 1960 designed by Giovanni Pintori

 

Olivetti Audit 20, 1967, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015
Olivetti Audit 20, 1967, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015

 

Olivetti Forum cover flyer, 1964, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015
Olivetti Forum cover flyer, 1964, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015

 

Olivetti Muitsumma 20, cover flyer, 1966, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015
Olivetti Muitsumma 20, cover flyer, 1966, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015

 

Olivetti Muitsumma 20, cover flyer, 1966, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015
Olivetti Muitsumma 20, cover flyer, 1966, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015

 

Olivetti Lettera 22, advertisement, 1952, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015
Olivetti Lettera 22, advertisement, 1952, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015

 

Olivetti Studio 44, poster, 1958, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015
Olivetti Studio 44, poster, 1958, designed by Giovanni Pintori. Scanned from Giovanni Pintori, Moleskine Books, 2015

“Giovanni Pintori maintains that ‘a page or a poster must be rich in significance and that its meaning must derive from the inherent qualities of the object or of the function to be publicized.’ These requirements can be met with conviction, lucidity, and taste, but another ingredient is needed to put the breath of life into print or a three-dimensional display — the personality and the vision of the artist.”— Museum of Modern Art

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